Skip to content
SUMMER IS HERE! SALE
SUMMER IS HERE! SALE

Frog Bikes Owner's Manual and Assembly Instructions

FROG OWNER’S MANUAL

Frog Bikes

May 2023


CONTENTS

  • General Warning - A Special Note for Parents
    1. INTRODUCTION
    • A. Bike Fit
    • B. Safety First
    • C. Assembly and Mechanical Safety Check
    • D. First Ride
    1. SAFETY
    • A. The Basics
    • B. Riding Safety
    • C. Off Road Safety
    • D. Wet Weather Riding
    • E. Night Riding
    • F. Extreme, Stunt or Competition Riding
    • G. Changing Components or Adding Accessories
    1. FIT
    • A. Standover Height
    • B. Saddle Position
    • C. Handlebar Height and Angle
    • D. Control Position Adjustments
    • E. Brake Reach
    1. TECH
    • A. Wheels
    • B. Seat Post Cam Action Clamp
    • C. Brakes
    • D. Shifting Gears
    • E. Pedals
    • F. Bicycle Suspension
    • G. Tyres and Tubes
    1. SERVICE AND MAINTENANCE
    • A. Service Intervals
    • B. If Your Bicycle Sustains an Impact
    1. APPENDIX A: Intended Use of Your Bicycle
    1. APPENDIX B: The Lifespan of Your Bike and its Components
    1. APPENDIX C: Coaster Brake
    1. APPENDIX D: Fastener Torque Specifications
    1. APPENDIX E: Getting Started with a Tadpole Balance Bike
    1. APPENDIX F: Recommended Tools
  • Warranty

General Warning

Like any sport, cycling involves a risk of injury and damage. By choosing to ride a bike, you assume the responsibility for that risk, so you need to know the rules of safe and responsible riding and correct use and maintenance. Proper use and maintenance of your bike reduces the risk of injury.

This manual contains many “Warnings” and “Cautions” concerning the consequences of failure to maintain or inspect your bike, and of failure to follow safe cycling practices.

  • The combination of the safety alert symbol and the word WARNING indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided, could result in serious injury or death.
  • The combination of the safety alert symbol and the word CAUTION indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided, may result in minor or moderate injury, or is an alert against unsafe practices.
  • The word CAUTION used without the safety alert symbol indicates a situation which, if not avoided, could result in serious damage to the bike or your warranty being void.

Many of the Warnings and Cautions say “you may lose control and fall”. Due to any fall can result in serious injury or even death, we do not always repeat the warning of possible injury or death.

As it is impossible to anticipate every situation or condition which can occur while riding, this manual makes no representation about the safe use of the bike under all conditions. There are risks associated with the use of any bicycle which cannot be predicted or avoided, and which are the sole responsibility of the rider.


A Special Note for Parents

As a parent or guardian, you are responsible for the activities and safety of your child, which includes making sure the bike is properly fitted to the child; that it is in good repair and safe operating condition; that you and your child have learned and understand the safe operation of the bike; and that you and your child have learned, understand and obey not only the applicable local motor vehicle, bicycle and traffic laws but also the common sense rules of safe and responsible cycling. As a parent, you should read this manual as well as review its warnings and the bike’s functions and operating procedures with your child before letting your child ride the bike.

WARNING: Make sure your child always wears an approved bicycle helmet when riding but always removes it when not cycling. A helmet should not be worn while playing, in play areas, on playground equipment, while climbing trees, or at any time while not riding a bicycle. Failure to follow this warning could result in serious injury or death.

WARNING: Make sure your child’s bike is sized correctly so that when the saddle is adjusted correctly, both feet can touch the ground. If your child’s new bike doesn’t fit, ask your stockist to exchange it before you ride it.


1. INTRODUCTION

A. Bike Fit

  1. Is your bike the right size? To check, see Section 3.A. If your bike is too large or too small you may lose control and fall. If your new bike is not the right size, ask your stockist to exchange it before you ride it.
  2. Is the saddle at the right height? To check, see Section 3.B. If you adjust your saddle height, follow the Minimum Insertion instructions in Section 3.B.
  3. Are saddle and seat post securely clamped? A correctly tightened saddle will allow no saddle movement in any direction. See Section 3.B.
  4. Are the stem and handlebars at the right height? If not, see Section 3.C.
  5. Can you comfortably operate the brakes? If not, you may be able to adjust their angle and reach. See Section 3.D and 3.E.
  6. Do you fully understand how to operate your new bike? If not, before your first ride, ask your stockist to explain any functions or features you do not understand.

B. Safety First

  1. Always wear an approved helmet when riding your bike, and follow the helmet manufacturer’s instructions for fit, use and care.
  2. Do you have all the other required and recommended safety equipment? See Section 2. It’s your responsibility to familiarize yourself with the laws of the areas where you ride, and to comply with all applicable laws.
  3. Do you know how to correctly secure your front and rear wheels? Check Section 4.A.1 to make sure. Riding with an improperly secured wheel can cause the wheel to wobble or disengage from the bike, and cause serious injury or death.
  4. If your bike has toe clips and straps or clipless (“step-in”) pedals, make sure you know how they work (see Section 4.E.) These pedals require special techniques and skills. Follow the pedal manufacturer’s instructions for use, adjustment and care.
  5. Do you have “toe overlap”? On smaller framed bikes your toe or toe clip may be able to contact the front wheel when a pedal is all the way forward and the wheel is turned. Read Section 4.E. to check whether you have toe overlap.
  6. Does your bike have suspension? If so, check Section 4.F. Suspension can change the way a bike performs. Follow the suspension manufacturer’s instructions for use, adjustment and care.
  7. Placing fingers in or around the chain area risks entrapment and injury.
  8. When handling a bike with disc brakes, beware of sharp edges and residual heat in the disc rotor after braking.

C. Assembly and Mechanical Safety Check

Routinely check the condition of your bicycle before every ride.

Nuts, bolts, screws & other fasteners: because manufacturers use a wide variety of fastener sizes and shapes made in a variety of materials, often differing by model and component, the correct tightening force or torque cannot be generalized. To make sure that the many fasteners on your bike are correctly tightened, refer to the Fastener Torque Specifications in Appendix D of this manual or to the torque specifications in the instructions provided by the manufacturer of the component in question. Correctly tightening a fastener requires a calibrated torque wrench. A professional bicycle mechanic with a torque wrench should torque the fasteners on your bike. If you choose to work on your own bike, you must use a torque wrench and the correct tightening torque specifications from the bike or component manufacturer or from your stockist. If you need to make an adjustment we urge you to exercise care and to have the fasteners checked by your stockist as soon as possible.

WARNING: Correct tightening force on fasteners – nuts, bolts, screws – on your bicycle is important. Too little force, and the fastener may not hold securely. Too much force, and the fastener can strip threads, stretch, deform or break. Either way, incorrect tightening force can result in component failure, which can cause you to lose control and fall. Make sure nothing is loose. Lift the front wheel off the ground by two or three inches, then let it bounce on the ground. Does anything sound, feel or look loose? Do a visual and tactile inspection of the whole bike. Are there any loose parts or accessories? If so, secure them. If you’re not sure, ask your nearest stockist to check.

Tyres and wheels: Make sure tyres are correctly inflated (see Section 4.G.1.) Check by putting one hand on the saddle, one on the intersection of the handlebars and stem, then bouncing your weight on the bike while looking at tyre deflection. Compare what you see with how it looks when you know the tyres are correctly inflated; and adjust if necessary. Are the tyres in good condition? Spin each wheel slowly and look for cuts in the tread and sidewall. Replace damaged tyres before riding the bike. Are the wheels “true”? Spin each wheel and check for brake clearance and lateral wobble. If a wheel wobbles side to side even slightly, or rubs against the brake pads, take the bike to your stockist to have the wheel corrected.

Fitting the front wheel: For bicycles with v-brakes or caliper brakes (see section C for details), please make sure that the brake is disconnected. Insert the wheel into the dropouts of the fork.

For the first pedal bikes and the balance bikes, make sure the hooked washer is on the outside of the fork legs with the hook facing towards the fork. Insert the hooked part of the washer into the hole above the dropout (fig.1). Ensure that the wheel is central and tighten with a 5mm Allen key to the recommended torque.

For bicycles with Quick Release axles, find the quick release skewer and place it through the wheel. Make sure that there is a spring on either side of the wheel; the wide parts of each spring should be furthest away from the wheel. Insert the wheel into the dropouts of the forks. Many people prefer the quick release lever to go on the left side of the bike; however, for bikes with disc brakes, it is recommended for the lever to go on the non-disc (right) side of the bike. In the case of a V- or Caliper brake, make sure that the rim is aligned centrally between the brake pads (see section 4.C). In the case of a disc brake, make sure that the disc is aligned centrally between the brake pads (see section 4.C). Tighten up the nut on the opposite side to the quick release lever and then close the lever with firm pressure. If it is too hard to close, undo the nut a little and then close it again. For bicycles with V-brakes or Caliper brakes, reconnect the brake once the wheel is securely in place and test that the brake is working correctly.

CAUTION: Wheels and disc rotors must be true for rim and disc brakes to work effectively. Wheel truing is a skill that requires special tools and experience. Do not attempt to true a wheel unless you have the knowledge, experience and tools needed to do the job correctly.

Wheel rims clean and undamaged? Make sure the rims are clean and undamaged at the tyre bead and, if you have rim brakes, along the braking surface. Check to make sure that any rim wear indicator marking is not visible at any point on the wheel rim. For disc brakes, make sure that the disc rotors and pads are not damaged or contaminated with oil.

WARNING: Bicycle wheel rims are subject to wear. Ask your stockist about wheel rim and disc wear. Some wheel rims have a rim wear indicator which becomes visible as the rim’s braking surface wears. A visible rim wear indicator on the side of the wheel rim is an indication that the wheel rim has reached its maximum usable life. Using a wheel or disc rotor that is at the end of its usable life can result in wheel failure, which can cause you to lose control and fall.

Brakes: The brakes need to be set up according to the correct country’s law. It’s very important for your safety that you learn and remember which brake lever controls which brake on your bike. Traditionally in the UK, the right brake lever controls the front brake and the left brake lever controls the rear brake; but, to ensure that your bike’s brakes are set up correctly, squeeze one brake lever and look to see which brake, front or rear, engages. Now do the same with the other brake lever.

Check the brakes for proper operation (see Section 4.C.) Squeeze the brake levers. Are the brake quick-releases closed? Are all the control cables in place? If you have rim brakes, do the brake pads contact the wheel rim squarely and make full contact with the rim? If you have disc brakes, do the brake pads contact the rotor squarely and make full contact with the rotor? Do the brakes begin to engage within an inch of brake lever movement? Can you apply full braking force without the levers touching the handlebar? If not, your brakes need adjustment. Do not ride the bike until the brakes are properly adjusted by a professional mechanic. Wheel retention system: Make sure the front and rear wheels are correctly secured. See Section 4.A.

Seat post: If your seat post has an over-centre cam action fastener for easy height adjustment, check that it is properly adjusted and in the locked position. See Section 4.B.

Fitting the handlebars correctly: (see fig.2) The handlebars need to be fitted to the bike. Unscrew the 4 bolts at the front of the stem and take off the front plate in order to position the handlebars centrally on the stem. Note the ridges on the handlebar indicate the center. Next, ensure the handlebars are straight. Loosen the side bolts with an Allen key. Flip the rubber cap out of the headset, then loosen with an Allen key. Position the handlebars to line up the stem with the front wheel. Tighten the top cap bolt first, then tighten the bolts on either side of the stem. Reposition the rubber cap.

Fitting the saddle: To adjust the height of the saddle, loosen the quick-release lever on the seat post clamp or undo the Allen bolt depending on the bike. Raise or lower the saddle so that it’s the same height as your child’s inside leg measurement, then close the quick-release lever or re-tighten the Allen bolt (see section 3B for further details).

Handlebar and saddle alignment: Make sure the saddle and handlebar stem are parallel to the bike’s center line and clamped tight enough so that you can’t twist them out of alignment. See Sections 3.B. and 3.C.

Handlebar ends: Make sure the handlebar grips are secure and in good condition. If not, ask your stockist to replace them. Make sure the handlebar ends and extensions are plugged. If not, ask your stockist to plug them before you ride. If the handlebars have bar end extensions, make sure they are clamped tight enough so you can’t twist them.

Adding the front reflector: To fit the front reflector, assemble the reflector to the clamp (fig.3). Unscrew the screw so that the collar fits around the handlebar. Make sure that the reflector is facing forward and re-tighten the screw.

Adding the rear reflector: To fit the rear reflector, assemble the reflector to the clamp (fig.4). Clip the reflector to the saddle as shown in the picture ensuring that it faces rearwards (fig.5).

Adding pedals: The pedals are pre-greased and marked Right and Left. Insert the Right pedal into the right crank arm (on the chain side) and turn clockwise to fit. Insert the Left pedal into the left crank arm and turn anticlockwise to fit. The spanner should not initially be required - screw the pedals in with your fingers and then tighten using a size 15mm spanner. Avoid over-tightening with the spanner.

Adding the bell: To fit the bell, unscrew the screw so that the collar fits around the handlebar. Position it so that the rider’s thumb can reach the bell easily, then re-tighten the screw.

WARNING: Loose or damaged handlebar grips, end plugs, or extensions should be replaced, as they can expose the ends of the handlebar, which have been known to cause injury, and they can cause you to lose control and fall. Unplugged handlebars or extensions can cut you and cause serious injury in an otherwise minor accident. This warning is particularly important for children’s bikes, which should be inspected regularly to ensure adequate protection for the ends of the handlebar is in place.

VERY IMPORTANT SAFETY NOTE: Please also read and become thoroughly familiar with the important information on the lifespan of your bicycle and its components in Appendix B on Page 44.

D. First Ride

When you go for your first ride on your new bike we recommend doing so away from cars, other cyclists, obstacles or hazards. Aim to become familiar with the controls, features and performance of your new bike. Familiarize yourself with the braking action of the bike (see Section 4.C.) Ensure that the brakes are set up according to the correct countries' law, traditionally in the UK the rear brake is actuated by the left-hand brake lever and the front brake is actuated by the right-hand brake lever. Test the brakes at slow speed, putting your weight toward the rear and gently applying the brakes, rear brake first. Sudden or excessive application of the front brake could pitch you over the handlebars. Applying brakes too hard can lock up a wheel, which could cause you to lose control and fall. Skidding is an example of what can happen when a wheel locks up.

If your bike has toe clips or clipless pedals, practice getting in and out of the pedals. See paragraph B.4. above and Section 4.E.4. If your bike has suspension, familiarize yourself with how the suspension responds to brake application and the position of your body. See paragraph B.6. above and Section 4.F. Practice shifting/changing the gears (see Section 4.D.) Never shift/change gears while pedaling backward, nor pedal backward immediately after having moved the shifter. This could jam the chain and cause serious damage to the bike.

Check out the handling and response of the bike, and also check the comfort. If you have any questions, or if you feel anything about the bike is not as it should be, consult your stockist before you ride again.


2. SAFETY

A. The Basics

WARNING: The area in which you ride may require specific safety devices. It is your responsibility to familiarize yourself with the laws of the area where you ride and to comply with all applicable laws, including properly equipping yourself and your bike as the law requires. Observe all local bicycle laws and regulations. Observe regulations about bicycle lighting, licensing of bicycles, riding on pavements, laws regulating bike path and trail use, helmet laws, child carrier laws, and special bicycle traffic laws. It’s your responsibility to know and obey the laws.

  1. Always wear a cycling helmet that meets the latest certification standards and is appropriate for the type of riding you do. Always follow the helmet manufacturer’s instructions for fit, use and care of your helmet. Many serious bike injuries involve head injuries which might have been avoided if the rider had worn an appropriate helmet (see fig.6).

WARNING: Failure to wear a helmet when riding may result in serious injury or death.

  1. Always do the Mechanical Safety Check (Section 1.C.) before you get on a bike.
  2. Be thoroughly familiar with the controls of your bike: brakes (Section 4.C.) Ensuring that they are set up the correct way round according to the correct countries' law; pedals (Section 4.E.); shifting (Section 4.D.)
  3. Be careful to keep body parts and other objects away from the sharp teeth of chain-rings, the moving chain, the turning pedals and cranks, and the spinning wheels of your bike.
  4. Always wear:
    • Shoes that will stay on your feet and will grip the pedals. Make sure that shoe laces cannot get into moving parts, and never ride barefoot or in sandals.
    • Bright, visible clothing that is not so loose that it will get tangled in the bike or snagged by objects at the side of the road or trail.
    • Protective eyewear, to protect against dirt, dust, and insects — tinted when the sun is bright, clear when it’s not.
  5. Don’t jump with your bike. Jumping a bike, particularly a BMX or mountain bike, can put huge and unpredictable stress on the bike and its components. Riders who jump their bikes risk serious damage and injury. Before you attempt to jump, perform stunts, or race with your bike, read and understand Section 2.F.
  6. Ride at a speed appropriate for conditions. Higher speed means higher risk.

B. Riding Safety

  1. Obey all rules of the road.
  2. Respect the rights of motorists, pedestrians, and other cyclists.
  3. Ride defensively, anticipating dangers. Always assume that other road users and pedestrians do not see you.
  4. Look ahead and be ready to avoid:
    • Vehicles slowing or turning, entering the road or your lane ahead of you, or coming up behind you.
    • Parked car doors opening.
    • Pedestrians stepping out.
    • Children or pets playing near the road.
    • Pot holes, manhole covers, railway tracks, expansion joints, road or pavement construction, debris, and other obstructions that could cause you to swerve into traffic, catch your wheel, or cause you to have an accident.
    • The many other hazards and distractions which can occur on a bike ride.
  5. Ride in designated bike lanes if available, on designated bike paths or as close to the edge of the road as possible, in the direction of traffic flow or as directed by local laws.
  6. Stop at stop signs and traffic lights; slow down and look both ways at street intersections. Remember that a bike comes off second best in a collision with a motor vehicle so be prepared to give way even if you have the right of way.
  7. Use approved hand signals for turning and stopping.
  8. Never ride wearing headphones or earphones. They mask traffic sounds and emergency vehicle sirens, distract you from concentrating on what’s going on, and the wires can tangle in the moving parts of the bike, causing you to lose control.
  9. Never carry a passenger, unless it is a small child wearing an approved helmet and secured in a correctly mounted child carrier or a child-carrying trailer.
  10. Never carry anything that obstructs your vision or your complete control of the bike, or which could become entangled in the moving parts of the bike.
  11. Never hold on to another vehicle.
  12. Don’t perform stunts, wheelies, or jumps. If you intend to do stunts, wheelies, jumps, or go racing with your bike despite our advice not to, read Section 2.F. Downhill, Stunt or Competition Biking. Think carefully about your skills before deciding to take the large risks that go with this kind of riding.
  13. Don’t weave through traffic or make any moves that may surprise people with whom you are sharing the road.
  14. Observe and give way to those who have the right of way.
  15. Never ride your bike under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
  16. If possible, avoid riding in bad weather when visibility is obscured, at dawn, dusk, or in the dark, or when extremely tired. Each of these conditions increases the risk of an accident.

C. Off-Road Safety

We recommend children do not ride on rough terrain unless accompanied by an adult.

  1. The variable conditions and hazards of off-road riding require close attention and specific skills. Start slowly on easier terrain and build up your skills. If your bike has suspension, the increased speed you may develop also increases your risk of losing control and falling. Learn how to handle your bike safely before trying increased speed or more difficult terrain.
  2. Wear appropriate safety clothing and equipment.
  3. Don’t ride alone in remote areas. Even when riding with others, make sure someone knows where you’re going and when you expect to be back.
  4. Always carry identification so that people know who you are in case of an accident; and take along some cash for food, a drink, or an emergency phone call.
  5. Give way to pedestrians and animals. Ride in a way that does not frighten or endanger them, and give them enough room so that their unexpected moves don’t endanger you.
  6. Be prepared. If something goes wrong while you’re riding off-road help may not be close at hand.
  7. Before you attempt to jump, perform stunts, or race with your bike, read and understand Section 2.F.

Off Road Respect

Obey the local laws regulating where and how you can ride off-road, and respect private property. You may be sharing the route with others — hikers, equestrians, other cyclists. Respect their rights. Stay on the designated cycle trail if there is one. Don’t exacerbate erosion by riding in mud or with unnecessary sliding. Don’t disturb wildlife by taking shortcuts through vegetation or streams. It is your responsibility to minimize your impact on the environment. Leave things as you find them.

D. Wet Weather Riding

WARNING: Wet weather impairs traction, braking, and visibility, both for the cyclist and other vehicles sharing the road. The risk of an accident is dramatically increased in wet conditions. Under wet conditions, the stopping power of your brakes (as well as the brakes of other vehicles sharing the road) is dramatically reduced and your tyres don’t grip as well. This makes it harder to control speed and easier to lose control. To make sure you can slow down and stop safely in wet conditions, ride more slowly and apply your brakes earlier and more gradually than you would in dry conditions. See also Section 4.C.

E. Night Riding

Riding a bike at night is much more dangerous than riding during the day. A cyclist is very difficult for motorists and pedestrians to see. Therefore children should never ride at dawn, at dusk, or at night. Adults who chose to accept the greatly increased risk of riding at dawn, at dusk, or at night need to take extra care both riding and choosing equipment which helps reduce that risk. Consult your stockist about night riding safety equipment.

WARNING: Reflectors are not a substitute for required lights. Riding at dawn, at dusk, at night, or at other times of poor visibility without an adequate bicycle lighting system and without reflectors is dangerous and may result in serious injury or death.

Bicycle reflectors are designed to pick up and reflect car lights and street lights in a way that may help you to be seen and be recognized as a moving bicyclist.

CAUTION: Check reflectors and their mounting brackets regularly to make sure that they are clean, straight, unbroken, and securely mounted. Replace damaged reflectors and straighten or tighten any that are bent or loose. The mounting brackets of front and rear reflectors are often designed as brake straddle cable safety catches which prevent the straddle cable from catching on the tyre tread if the cable jumps out of its yoke or breaks. WARNING: Do not remove the front or rear reflectors or reflector brackets from your bike. They are an integral part of the bike’s safety system. Removing the reflectors reduces your visibility to others. The reflector brackets may protect you from a brake straddle cable catching on the tyre in the event of brake cable failure. If a brake straddle cable catches on the tyre, it can cause the wheel to stop suddenly, causing you to lose control and fall.

If you choose to ride under conditions of poor visibility, check and be sure you comply with all local laws about night riding, and take the following strongly recommended additional precautions:

  • Purchase and install battery or generator-powered front and rear lights which meet all regulations and provide adequate visibility.
  • Wear light-colored, reflective clothing and accessories, such as a reflective vest, reflective arm and leg bands, reflective stripes on your helmet, flashing lights attached to your body and/or your bike. Any reflective device or light source that moves will help alert approaching motorists, pedestrians, and other traffic.
  • Make sure your clothing or anything you may be carrying on the bike does not obstruct a reflector or light.
  • Make sure your bike is equipped with correctly positioned and securely mounted reflectors.

While riding at dawn, at dusk, or at night:

  • Ride slowly.
  • Avoid dark areas and areas of heavy or fast-moving traffic.
  • Avoid road hazards.
  • If possible, ride on familiar routes.

If riding in traffic:

  • Be predictable. Ride so drivers can see you and predict your movements.
  • Be alert. Ride defensively and expect the unexpected.
  • If you plan to ride in traffic regularly, ask your stockist about cycling safety courses or a good source of information on traffic safety.

F. Extreme, Stunt, or Competition Riding

Extreme or aggressive riding is dangerous and you voluntarily assume a greatly increased risk of injury or death.

Not all bikes are designed for extreme riding, and those that are may not be suitable for all types of aggressive riding. Check with your stockist about the suitability of your bike.

When riding downhill you can reach speeds achieved by motorbikes, and therefore face similar hazards and risks. Make sure your bike is in perfect condition.

Consult with expert riders or officials (if in competition) on conditions and wear appropriate safety gear such as a full-face helmet, full finger gloves, and body armor. It is your responsibility to have proper equipment and to be familiar with course conditions.

WARNING: Although many catalogs, advertisements, and articles depict riders engaged in extreme riding, this activity is extremely dangerous, increases your risk of injury or death, and increases the severity of any injury. Remember that the action depicted is being performed by professionals with many years of training and experience. Know your limits and always wear a helmet and other appropriate safety gear. Even with state-of-the-art protective safety gear, you could be seriously injured or killed when jumping, stunt riding, riding downhill at speed, or in competition.

WARNING: Bicycles and bicycle parts have limitations with regard to strength and integrity, and this type of riding can exceed those limitations.

We recommend against this type of riding because of the increased risks; but if you choose to take the risk, at least:

  • Take lessons from a competent instructor first.
  • Start with easy exercises and slowly develop your skills before trying more difficult or dangerous riding.
  • Use only designated areas for stunts, jumping, racing, or fast downhill riding.
  • Wear a full-face helmet, safety pads, and other safety gear.
  • Understand and recognize that the stresses imposed on your bike by this kind of activity may break or damage parts of the bike and void the warranty.
  • Take your bike to your stockist if anything breaks or bends. Do not ride your bike when any part is damaged.
  • If you ride downhill at speed, perform stunts, or ride in competition, know the limits of your skill and experience. Ultimately, avoiding injury is your responsibility.

G. Changing Components or Adding Accessories

There are many components and accessories available to enhance the comfort, performance, and appearance of your bike. However, if you change components or add accessories you do so at your own risk. We may not have tested that component or accessory for compatibility, reliability, or safety on your bike. Before installing any component or accessory, including a different size tyre, make sure it is compatible with your bike by checking with your stockist. Be sure to read, understand, and follow the instructions that accompany the products you purchase for your bike. See also Appendix A and B.

WARNING: Failure to confirm compatibility, properly install, operate, and maintain any component or accessory can result in serious injury or death.

WARNING: Changing the components on your bike with other than genuine replacement parts may compromise the safety of your bicycle and may void the warranty. For example, replacement forks must have the same rake and steerer tube inner diameter as those originally fitted with the bicycle. Check with your stockist before changing the components on your bike.

NOTE: Correct fit is an essential element of cycling safety, performance, and comfort. Making the adjustments to your bike that result in the correct fit for your body and riding conditions requires experience, skill, and special tools. Always ask your stockist to make the adjustments or, if you have the experience, skill, and tools, ask your stockist to check your work before riding.

WARNING: Make sure that the seat position is adjustable so that the feet of a seated rider can touch the ground. This warning is particularly important for children. If your bike does not fit properly you may lose control and fall. If your new bike doesn’t fit, ask your stockist to exchange it before you ride it.


3. FIT

A. Standover Height

  1. Diamond frame bikes

    Standover height is the basic element of bike fit (see fig.7). It is the distance from the ground to the top of the bike’s frame at that point where your crotch is when straddling the bike.

    To check for correct standover height, straddle the bike while wearing the kind of shoes in which you’ll be riding, and bounce on your heels. If your crotch touches the frame, the bike is too big for you. A bike which you ride on roads and don’t take off-road should give you a minimum standover height clearance of two inches (5 cm). A bike you’ll ride on unpaved surfaces should give you a minimum of three inches (7.5 cm) of standover height clearance. A bike you’ll use off-road should give you four inches (10 cm) or more of clearance.

  2. Step-through frame bikes

    Standover height does not apply to bikes with step-through frames. Instead, the limiting dimension is determined by saddle height range. You must be able to adjust your saddle position as described in B without exceeding the limits set by the height of the top of the seat tube and the “Minimum Insertion” or “Maximum Extension” mark on the seat post.

B. Saddle Position

Correct saddle adjustment is an important factor in getting the most performance and comfort from your bike. If the saddle position is not comfortable for you, see your stockist. The saddle can be adjusted in three directions:

  1. Up and down adjustment. To check for correct saddle height (see fig. 8):

    • Sit on the saddle;
    • Place one heel on a pedal;
    • Rotate the crank until the pedal with your heel on it is in the down position and the crank arm is parallel to the seat tube.

    If your leg is not completely straight, your saddle height needs to be adjusted. If you need to rock your hips for the heel to reach the pedal, the saddle is too high. If your leg is bent at the knee with your heel on the pedal, the saddle is too low.

    Ask your stockist to set the saddle for your optimal riding position and to show you how to make this adjustment. If you choose to make your own saddle height adjustment:

    • Loosen the seat post clamp
    • Raise or lower the seat post in the seat tube
    • Make sure the saddle is straight
    • Re-tighten the seat post clamp to the recommended torque (see Appendix D).

    Once the saddle is at the correct height, make sure that the seat post does not project from the frame beyond its “Minimum Insertion” or “Maximum Extension” mark (see fig. 9).

    NOTE: Some bikes have a sight hole in the seat tube, the purpose of which is to make it easy to see whether the seat post is inserted in the seat tube far enough to be safe. If your bike has such a sight hole, use it instead of the “Minimum Insertion” or “Maximum Extension” mark to make sure the seat post is inserted in the seat tube far enough to be visible through the sight hole.

    WARNING: If your seat post is not inserted in the seat tube as described in B.1 above, the seat post may break, which could cause you to lose control and fall.

  2. Front and back adjustment. The saddle can be adjusted forwards or back to help you achieve the optimal position on the bike. Ask your stockist to set the saddle for your optimal riding position and to show you how to make this adjustment. If you choose to make your own front and back adjustment, make sure the clamp mechanism is clamping on the straight part of the saddle rails and not touching the curved part of the rails, and that you are using the recommended torque on the clamping fastener(s) (see Appendix D).

  3. Saddle angle adjustment. Most people prefer a horizontal saddle; but some riders like the saddle nose angled up or down just a little. Your stockist can adjust saddle angle or teach you how to do it. If you choose to make your own saddle angle adjustment and you have a single bolt saddle clamp on your seat post, it is critical that you loosen the clamp bolt sufficiently to allow any serrations on the mechanism to disengage before changing the saddle’s angle, and then that the serrations fully re-engage before you tighten the clamp bolt to the recommended torque (see Appendix D).

    WARNING: When making saddle angle adjustments with a single bolt saddle clamp always check to make sure the serrations on the mating surfaces of the clamp are not worn. Worn serrations can allow the saddle to move, causing you to lose control and fall.

Always tighten fasteners to the correct torque. Bolts that are too tight can stretch and deform. Bolts that are too loose can move and wear. Either can lead to a sudden failure of the bolt, causing you to lose control and fall.

NOTE: If your bike is equipped with a suspension seat post, the suspension mechanism may require periodic service or maintenance. Ask your stockist for recommended service intervals for your suspension seat post.

Small changes in saddle position can have a substantial effect on performance and comfort. To find your best saddle position, make only one adjustment at a time.

WARNING: After any saddle adjustment, be sure that the saddle adjusting mechanism is properly seated and tightened before riding. A loose saddle clamp or seat post clamp can cause damage to the seat post, or can cause you to lose control and fall. A correctly tightened saddle adjusting mechanism will allow no saddle movement in any direction. Periodically check to make sure that the saddle adjusting mechanism is properly tightened.

If, in spite of carefully adjusting the saddle height, tilt and fore-and-aft position, your saddle is still uncomfortable, you may need a different saddle design. Saddles come in many different shapes and sizes. Your stockist can help you select a saddle which, when correctly adjusted for your body and riding style, will be comfortable.

WARNING: Some people have claimed that extended riding with a saddle which is incorrectly adjusted or which does not support your pelvic area correctly can cause short-term or long-term injury to nerves and blood vessels, or even impotence. If your saddle causes you pain, numbness or other discomfort, listen to your body and stop riding until you see your stockist about saddle adjustment or a different saddle.

C. Handlebar Height and Angle

Frog bikes are equipped with a “threadless” stem, which clamps on to the outside of the steerer tube. Your stockist may be able to change handlebar height by moving height adjustment spacers from below the stem to above the stem, or vice versa. Otherwise, you’ll have to get a stem of different length or rise. Consult your stockist. Do not attempt to do this yourself, as it requires special knowledge.

WARNING: On some bikes, changing the stem or stem height can affect the tension of the front brake cable, locking the front brake or creating excess cable slack which can make the front brake inoperable. If the front brake pads move in towards the wheel rim or out away from the wheel rim when the stem or stem height is changed, the brakes must be correctly adjusted before you ride the bike.

WARNING: Always tighten fasteners to the correct torque. Bolts that are too tight can stretch and deform. Bolts that are too loose can move and fatigue. Either mistake can lead to a sudden failure of the bolt, causing you to lose control and fall.

WARNING: An insufficiently tightened stem clamp bolt, handlebar clamp bolt, or bar end extension clamping bolt may compromise steering action, which could cause you to lose control and fall. Place the front wheel of the bike between your legs and attempt to twist the handlebar/stem assembly. If you can twist the stem in relation to the front wheel, turn the handlebars in relation to the stem, or turn the bar end extensions in relation to the handlebar, the bolts aren’t tight enough.

WARNING: During the use of aero extensions, you will have less control over the bike. You will have a diminished ability to steer. You will also need to reset your hands to operate the brakes, which means your response to braking will take longer.

D. Control Position Adjustments

The angle of the brake and shift control levers and their position on the handlebars can be changed. Ask your stockist to make the adjustments for you. If you choose to make your own control lever angle adjustment, be sure to re-tighten the clamp fasteners to the recommended torque (see Appendix D).

E. Brake Reach

Many bikes have brake levers that can be adjusted for reach. If you have small hands or find it difficult to squeeze the brake levers your stockist can either adjust the reach or fit shorter reach brake levers.

WARNING: The shorter the brake lever reach, the more critical it is to have correctly adjusted brakes so that full braking power can be applied within available brake lever travel. If the brake lever travel isn’t enough to apply full braking power it can result in loss of control, which may result in serious injury or death.

It’s important to your safety, performance, and enjoyment to understand how things work on your bike. We urge you to ask your stockist how to do the things described in this section before you attempt them yourself, and that you ask your stockist to check your work before you ride. If you have even the slightest doubt as to whether you understand something in this section, talk to your stockist. See also Appendix A, B, C, and D.


4. TECHNICAL INFORMATION

A. Wheels

Bicycle wheels are designed to be removable for easier transportation and for puncture repairs. In most cases, the wheel axles are inserted into slots called “dropouts,” in the fork and frame, but some suspension mountain bikes use what is called a “through axle” wheel mounting system.

If you have a mountain bike equipped with through axle wheels make sure your stockist has given you the relevant instructions, and follow those when installing or removing a through axle wheel. If you don’t know what a through axle is, ask your stockist.

Frog Bikes wheels are secured in one of two ways:

  • Frog 52 upwards use a hollow axle with a shaft (“skewer”) running through it which has an adjustable tension nut on one end and an over-centre cam on the other (see fig.10).
  • Tadpole Mini, Tadpole, Tadpole+, Frog 43, Frog 48, and Frog 52s have 15 hex nuts or hex key bolts which are threaded onto or into the hub axle (see fig.11).

Your bike may be equipped with a different securing method for the front wheel than for the rear wheel. Discuss the wheel securing method for your bike with your stockist.

It is very important that you understand the type of wheel securing method on your bike, that you know how to secure the wheels correctly, and that you know how to apply the correct clamping force that safely secures the wheel. Ask your stockist to instruct you in correct wheel removal and installation, and ask them to give you the relevant instructions.

WARNING: Riding with an improperly secured wheel can allow the wheel to wobble or fall off the bike, which can cause serious injury or death. Therefore, it is essential that you:

  • Ask your stockist to help you make sure you know how to install and remove your wheels safely.
  • Understand and apply the correct technique for clamping your wheel in place.
  • Check that the wheel is securely clamped each time before you ride.
  • Make sure that the clamping action results in a completely secured wheel that embosses the surfaces of the dropouts.
  1. Front Wheel Secondary Retention Devices

    Most bikes have front forks that utilize a secondary wheel retention device to reduce the risk of the wheel disengaging from the fork if the wheel is incorrectly secured. Secondary retention devices are not a substitute for correctly securing your front wheel.

    Secondary retention devices fall into two basic categories:

    • The clip-on type is a part the manufacturer adds to the front wheel hub or front fork.
    • The integral type is molded, cast, or machined into the outer faces of the front fork dropouts.

    Ask your stockist to explain the particular secondary retention device on your bike.

    WARNING: Do not remove or disable the secondary retention device. As its name implies, it serves as a backup for a critical adjustment. If the wheel is not secured correctly, the secondary retention device can reduce the risk of the wheel disengaging from the fork. Removing or disabling the secondary retention device may also void the warranty. Secondary retention devices are not a substitute for correctly securing your wheel. Failure to properly secure the wheel can cause the wheel to wobble or disengage, which could cause you to lose control and fall, resulting in serious injury or death.

  2. Wheels with Cam Action Systems

    There are currently two types of over-centre cam wheel retention mechanisms: Both use an over-centre cam action to clamp the bike’s wheel in place. Your bike may have a cam-and-cup front wheel retention system and a traditional rear wheel cam action system.

    a. Adjusting the traditional cam action mechanism

    The wheel hub is clamped in place by the force of the over-centre cam pushing against one dropout and pulling the tension adjusting nut, by way of the skewer, against the other dropout. The amount of clamping force is controlled by the tension adjusting nut. Turning the tension adjusting nut clockwise while keeping the cam lever from rotating increases clamping force; turning it anticlockwise while keeping the cam lever from rotating reduces clamping force. Less than half a turn of the tension adjusting nut can make the difference between safe clamping force and unsafe clamping force.

    WARNING: The full force of the cam action is needed to clamp the wheel securely. Holding the nut with one hand and turning the lever like a wing nut with the other hand until everything is as tight as you can get it will not clamp a cam action wheel safely in the dropouts.

    b. Adjusting the cam-and-cup mechanism

    The cam-and-cup system on your front wheel will have been correctly adjusted for your bike by your stockist. Ask them to check the adjustment every six months. Do not use a cam-and-cup front wheel on any bike other than the one for which it was adjusted.

  3. Removing and Installing Wheels

    WARNING: If your bike is equipped with a hub brake such as a rear coaster brake, front or rear drum, band or roller brake; or if it has an internal gear rear hub, do not attempt to remove the wheel. The removal and re-installation of most hub brakes and internal gear hubs require special knowledge. Incorrect removal or assembly can result in brake or gear failure, which can cause you to lose control and fall.

    CAUTION: If your bike has a disc brake, exercise care in touching the rotor or caliper. Disc rotors have sharp edges, and both rotor and caliper can get very hot during use.

    ATTENTION: For bikes with disc brakes, make sure that on the front wheel the cam lever is located on the non-disc side (right side when sitting on the bike) to avoid interference of the cam lever with the disc.

    a. Removing a disc brake or rim brake front wheel

    1. If your bike has rim brakes, disengage the brake’s quick-release mechanism to increase the clearance between the tyre and the brake pads (See Section 4.C. fig. 13 to 15).
    2. If your bike has cam action front wheel retention, move the cam lever from the locked or CLOSED position to the OPEN position (see fig. 12a, b, & c).
    3. If your bike has through axle front wheel retention, follow the instructions provided by the manufacturer of the retention system.
    4. Lift the front wheel off the ground a few inches and tap the top of the wheel with the palm of your hand to release the wheel from the front fork.

    b. Installing a disc brake or rim brake front wheel

    1. If your bike has a disc brake, make sure that the cam lever is located on the non-disc side (right side when sitting on the bike).
    2. If your bike has cam action front wheel retention, move the cam lever to the OPEN position (see fig. 12a, b, & c).
    3. Install the wheel between the dropouts, so that the axle seats firmly at the top of the slots in the fork dropouts.
    4. If your bike has a disc brake, make sure that the disc rotor is correctly inserted in the calliper and between the brake pads.
    5. If your bike has cam action front wheel retention, adjust the tension adjusting nut so that the cam lever closes with firm resistance (see fig. 12d). To apply enough clamping force, the cam lever should be in the CLOSED position when the lever is parallel to the fork blade and is curved toward the tyre (see fig. 12e). If you can fully close the cam lever without wrapping your fingers around the fork blade for leverage and the lever does not leave a clear imprint in the palm of your hand, the tension is insufficient. Open the lever, turn the tension adjusting nut clockwise a quarter turn, and try again.
    6. If your bike has through axle front wheel retention, follow the instructions provided by the manufacturer of the retention system.
    7. If your bike has rim brakes, close the brake’s quick-release mechanism to restore correct brake pad-to-rim clearance (See Section 4.C. fig. 13 to 15).

    WARNING: Securing the wheel with an inadequate amount of clamping force may result in the wheel disengaging from the bicycle or from shifting position in the dropouts, which can cause you to lose control and fall. Therefore, it is essential that you:

    • Ask your stockist to help you make sure you know how to install and remove your wheels safely.
    • Understand and apply the correct technique for clamping your wheel in place.
    • Each time, before you ride the bike, check that the wheel is securely clamped.

    c. Removing a rear wheel with a derailleur gear system

    1. Shift the rear derailleur to high gear (the smallest, outermost rear sprocket).
    2. If your bike has rim brakes, disengage the brake’s quick-release mechanism to increase the clearance between the tyre and the brake pads (See Section 4.C. fig. 13 to 15).
    3. Move the cam lever to the OPEN position (see fig. 12a, b, & c).
    4. Pull the derailleur body back with your right hand.
    5. Lift the rear wheel off the ground a few inches and push it forward and down out of the rear dropouts.

    d. Installing a rear wheel with a derailleur gear system

    1. Shift the rear derailleur to high gear (the smallest, outermost rear sprocket).
    2. Pull the derailleur body back with your right hand.
    3. Put the chain on top of the smallest sprocket.
    4. Insert the wheel into the rear dropouts and pull it all the way in to the dropouts.
    5. Move the cam lever to the CLOSED position (see fig. 12d).
    6. If you have a through axle rear wheel, follow the instructions provided by the manufacturer of the through axle system.
    7. If your bike has rim brakes, close the brake’s quick-release mechanism to restore correct brake pad-to-rim clearance (See Section 4.C. fig. 13 to 15).

    WARNING: Securing the wheel with an inadequate amount of clamping force may result in the wheel disengaging from the bicycle or from shifting position in the dropouts, which can cause you to lose control and fall. Therefore, it is essential that you:

    • Ask your stockist to help you make sure you know how to install and remove your wheels safely.
    • Understand and apply the correct technique for clamping your wheel in place.
    • Each time, before you ride the bike, check that the wheel is securely clamped.
  4. Installing and Removing Bolt-on Wheels

    If your bike has bolt-on wheels, installing and removing the wheels requires a 15 mm socket, box, open-end wrench, or an adjustable wrench.

    WARNING: If your bike has a hub brake such as a rear coaster brake, front or rear drum, band, or roller brake; or if it has an internal gear rear hub, do not attempt to remove the wheel. The removal and re-installation of most hub brakes and internal gear hubs require special knowledge. Incorrect removal or assembly can result in brake or gear failure, which can cause you to lose control and fall.

    CAUTION: If your bike has a disc brake, exercise care in touching the rotor or calliper. Disc rotors have sharp edges, and both rotor and calliper can get very hot during use.

    WARNING: Securing the wheel with an inadequate amount of clamping force may result in the wheel disengaging from the bicycle or from shifting position in the dropouts, which can cause you to lose control and fall. Therefore, it is essential that you:

    • Ask your stockist to help you make sure you know how to install and remove your wheels safely.
    • Understand and apply the correct technique for clamping your wheel in place.
    • Each time, before you ride the bike, check that the wheel is securely clamped.

B. Seat Post Cam Action Clamp

WARNING: Riding with an improperly tightened seat post can allow the saddle to turn or move and cause you to lose control and fall. Therefore:

  • Ask your stockist to help you make sure you know how to correctly clamp your seat post.
  • Understand and apply the correct technique for clamping your seat post.
  • Before you ride the bike, first check that the seat post is securely clamped.

Your bike may be equipped with a cam action seat post binder, which replaces the traditional binder bolt and nut. The cam action binder and the traditional binder bolt perform the same function, but do so with a different mechanism and adjustment procedure. With a cam action system, the amount of clamping force is controlled by the tension adjusting nut. Turning the tension adjusting nut clockwise while keeping the cam lever from rotating increases clamping force; turning it anticlockwise while keeping the cam lever from rotating reduces clamping force. Less than half a turn of the tension adjusting nut can make the difference between safe and unsafe clamping force. The full force of the cam action is needed to clamp the seat post securely.

Holding the nut with one hand and turning the lever like a wing nut with the other hand until everything is as tight as you can get it will not clamp a cam action binder securely.

WARNING: Correct clamping force is critical to safe riding. If you do not understand how to correctly clamp your seat post binder, ask your stockist for help. Too little clamping force can cause the seat post to slip in the seat tube, which can cause you to lose control and fall. Too much clamping force can damage the seat post or the seat post binder, which can cause you to lose control and fall. Ask your stockist to help you understand the correct clamping force for your bike.

C. Brakes

There are three general types of bicycle brakes: rim brakes, disc brakes, and internal hub brakes. All three can operate either as hand-operated brakes or as coaster brakes. A very small number of bikes may be equipped with hydraulic rim or disc brakes.

1. Rim Brakes

Rim brakes are very simple to use, but must be adjusted correctly to work well. Squeeze the brake levers to make sure they apply braking force to the wheel rims before you start to ride. If the brake lever does not engage the brake pads, do not ride the bike. Adjust the brake pads according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. If you are not familiar with the adjustment process, ask your stockist to adjust them for you.

2. Disc Brakes

Disc brakes may be cable operated or hydraulic. Follow the brake manufacturer’s instructions to adjust and maintain disc brakes.

WARNING: Disc brakes are extremely powerful, so learning to modulate or control them is essential to avoid skidding or loss of control. Because of their power and the small lever movement required, novice riders can lock a wheel and lose control. The small amount of lever movement also means that only a small movement of the lever is needed to engage the brakes, and this can be startling when you are used to a bike with different brakes.

WARNING: Disc brake rotors get hot during use and will stay hot for a while even after use. Be careful not to touch a hot rotor. Also, the rotor edges can be sharp.

WARNING: If replacing disc brake pads, always replace them as a set – the pads from the same wheel. Fitting mismatched brake pads can result in the failure of the brakes and cause you to lose control and fall.

3. Coaster Brakes

A coaster brake is a special type of internal hub brake, which is engaged by backpedaling. It is generally found on kids’ bikes and some adult cruiser bikes. The main advantage of a coaster brake is that it can be applied when the rider’s hands are not on the handlebars, which is particularly useful when teaching children to ride a bike. The main disadvantages are that it provides only rear wheel braking and that it does not allow fine modulation of braking force.

WARNING: Riding with improperly adjusted brakes or worn brake pads is dangerous and can result in serious injury or death. Brakes must be maintained and inspected frequently. The brake lever travel should be checked before every ride. Brake pads must be inspected for wear and replaced when necessary. If you have any questions or concerns about your brakes, consult your stockist.

D. Shifting Gears

Your bike is equipped with a gear shifting mechanism that allows you to change the gear ratio between the pedals and the rear wheel. Lower gears make it easier to pedal and are used for going uphill. Higher gears make it harder to pedal and are used for going downhill or riding at higher speeds on flat terrain. Learning to shift gears properly will improve your cycling experience and make riding easier.

WARNING: Improper shifting can damage the drive train and result in loss of control or an accident. Always shift gears before you start to pedal harder, such as when approaching a hill. If you shift while pedaling hard, you can damage the gears, chain, and derailleur.

1. How to Shift

Most bikes have derailleurs that shift the chain between different sized gears. The left shifter controls the front derailleur, which moves the chain between the front chainrings. The right shifter controls the rear derailleur, which moves the chain between the rear sprockets.

2. Shifting Basics

To shift gears, you need to be pedaling, but do not pedal hard. Ease up on the pedals and shift into the desired gear. Once the chain is in place, you can start pedaling harder.

E. Pedals

Your bike may be equipped with one of the following types of pedals:

  • Platform pedals: The most common type of pedal, suitable for all types of riding.
  • Toe clips and straps: A type of pedal that allows you to secure your foot to the pedal for better control and efficiency.
  • Clipless pedals: A type of pedal that allows you to clip your cycling shoes directly to the pedal for maximum control and efficiency.

WARNING: When using toe clips and straps or clipless pedals, make sure you know how to release your feet quickly. Practice releasing your feet before riding in traffic or on difficult terrain. If you cannot release your feet quickly, you risk falling and causing serious injury or death.

F. Bicycle Suspension

Your bike may be equipped with a suspension fork or rear shock absorber. Suspension improves comfort and control by absorbing bumps and shocks from the road or trail.

WARNING: Suspension systems require regular maintenance. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for maintaining your suspension system. Improper maintenance can result in loss of control and cause serious injury or death.

G. Tyres and Tubes

Your bike is equipped with tyres that are appropriate for the type of riding you will be doing. Always check the tyre pressure before you ride. The correct pressure is printed on the side of the tyre.

WARNING: Riding with under-inflated or over-inflated tyres can cause loss of control and result in serious injury or death. Under-inflated tyres can also cause damage to the tyres and rims.


5. SERVICE AND MAINTENANCE

A. Service Intervals

Your bike requires regular maintenance to ensure it remains safe and reliable. The following are general service intervals for a bike used under normal conditions. If you use your bike more frequently or under more extreme conditions, you may need to service it more often.

Before Every Ride

  • Check tyre pressure and inflate if necessary.
  • Check brakes for proper operation.
  • Check wheels for trueness and proper alignment.
  • Check that the wheels are securely fastened.
  • Check that the seat and handlebars are securely fastened.
  • Check that the pedals are securely fastened.
  • Check that the chain is properly lubricated and tensioned.

Every Month

  • Check that all bolts and nuts are securely fastened.
  • Check that the brakes are properly adjusted.
  • Check that the gears are properly adjusted.
  • Check that the tyres are in good condition and replace if necessary.

Every 6 Months

  • Have a professional mechanic inspect your bike for any signs of wear or damage.
  • Replace any worn or damaged components.

Every Year

  • Have a professional mechanic perform a thorough inspection and service of your bike.

B. If Your Bicycle Sustains an Impact

If your bike sustains an impact, such as a crash or hitting a large pothole, it is important to have it inspected by a professional mechanic. Impacts can cause damage that is not immediately visible and can compromise the safety of your bike.


6. APPENDIX A: Intended Use of Your Bicycle

Your bike is designed for specific types of riding. Using your bike for purposes other than its intended use can result in damage and serious injury. Consult your stockist if you are unsure of the intended use of your bike.

WARNING: Using your bike for purposes other than its intended use can result in damage and serious injury or death. Always use your bike as intended and follow the manufacturer’s instructions for use and maintenance.


7. APPENDIX B: The Lifespan of Your Bike and its Components

The lifespan of your bike and its components depends on many factors, including the type of riding you do, the conditions you ride in, and how well you maintain your bike. Regular maintenance and inspection can help extend the lifespan of your bike and its components.

WARNING: Failure to maintain and inspect your bike and its components can result in damage and serious injury or death. Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions for maintenance and inspection.


8. APPENDIX C: Coaster Brake

A coaster brake is a type of internal hub brake that is engaged by backpedaling. It is commonly found on children’s bikes and some adult cruiser bikes. The main advantage of a coaster brake is that it can be applied when the rider’s hands are not on the handlebars. The main disadvantages are that it provides only rear wheel braking and does not allow fine modulation of braking force.


9. APPENDIX D: Fastener Torque Specifications

It is important to tighten all fasteners to the correct torque to ensure the safety and reliability of your bike. Over-tightening can cause damage to the fasteners and components, while under-tightening can result in the fasteners coming loose.


10. APPENDIX E: Getting Started with a Tadpole Balance Bike

A Tadpole Balance Bike is designed for young children who are learning to ride. It has no pedals or chain and is propelled by the child pushing their feet on the ground. Balance bikes help children develop balance and coordination skills.

WARNING: Always supervise your child when they are using a balance bike. Ensure that they wear an approved helmet and other protective gear.


11. APPENDIX F: Recommended Tools

Having the right tools is essential for maintaining and repairing your bike. The following tools are recommended for basic bike maintenance:

  • Allen keys (various sizes)
  • Screwdrivers (Phillips and flathead)
  • Spanners (various sizes)
  • Tyre levers
  • Pump
  • Chain lubricant
  • Torque wrench

WARNING: Using the wrong tools or not using tools correctly can result in damage to your bike and serious injury. Always use the correct tools and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.


Warranty

Your Frog Bike is covered by a warranty against defects in materials and workmanship. The warranty does not cover normal wear and tear, damage caused by improper use or maintenance, or modifications to the bike.

For full warranty details, please refer to the warranty information provided with your bike or contact your stockist.